Bungy Jumping As Stunts

´╗┐Bungy Jumping As Stunts

While we may never know for certain which is actually stronger– the media’s influence on the public, or the public’s influence on the media– but there is no way to discount the fact that the influence in both directions is very strong indeed. The general population, especially the younger people, are greatly influenced by what they see on on the movie screen, and they wish to emulate their favorite stars. The actions which the celebrities take part in, American youth wants to take part in also. And bungy jumping is no exception!

On the other hand, what is presented in the media often clearly mirrors the behaviors and the lifestyles of the American public. For better or for worse, a large part of American entertainment is based on mimicking their audiences. If it is popular amongst “regular folks,” presenting it on the movie screen tends to make it even more popular.

One of the most well-known recent movie stunts showed James Bond jumping over the edge of a dam in “GoldenEye.” Bond’s bungy jump stunt was for real, not merely a movie effect. Bungy jumping has become an interesting stunt in modern movies, as evidenced by the growing number of bungy jumping companies which offer special training to those who plan to do similar stunts in films. On the Hollywood scene there have always been actors who specialized in movie stunts in general, but seeing more doing bungy jumping stunts shows how popular this sport has become.

The James Bond character, stunt-doubled by Wayne Michaels, may have performed one of the most recently popular bungy jump stunts, but is far from being unique. Even thought it was voted as the best stunt ever filmed did not distract others from attempting the same feat; perhaps it even assisted others in wanting to meet or even outdo what Wayne Michaels did.

Bungee America, which offers great bungy jumping experiences to all who wish to try the sport, is also Hollywood’s number one bungy stunt company. Since 1996, they have assisted in the bungy jump stunts for no less than forty-five Hollywood films. The first, made in February, 1996, starred Arnold Schwarzenegger in his movie “Eraser.” In this movie, which involved falling sixty-five feet and doing a back-flip, Schwarzenegger did not use a double, but performed the stunt himself. This is quite impressive, and surely a positive influence on the fans, because most stars do use doubles in their place for such dangerous stunts. It undoubtedly has prodded his already-large number of fans to have an even deeper respect for this actor.

Bungy jumping is clearly a sport which is here to stay, and its appeal in the media proves it. The more that Hollywood presents it as stunts in their films the more the general public will want to take part; and the wider the public interest and involvement in bungy jumping, the more commonplace it will continue to be on the movie screen– for daily life mirrors the media, and the media mirrors daily life.

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